Reading books and doing activities together as a family creates memories that last a lifetime and research shows that it can greatly influence your child’s literacy. So why not celebrate National Family Literacy Month all year long? November is family literacy month and we’re privileged to come alongside your family to provide ways to empower your students to practice literacy-building activities, not only at school but also at home.

We couldn’t be more excited about our literacy program at PCA because we know that literacy is not simply about reading. Literacy is the way we learn, communicate, and construct ideas. As I visited a first-grade class this week, I observed students gradually gaining responsibility and owning their own strategies during the literacy block. Students are actively involved in the thinking process, making decisions, and bringing background knowledge to the text to help construct meaning. They have access to thousands of books that “fit” them and share their reading and writing in a community that builds and honors students’ individual learning needs. At PCA, we enjoy a variety of literacy programs and activities to produce life-long learners who are able to read, write, communicate, problem solve and participate in decision-making through the lens of God’s Word.

Here are a few ideas compiled below to encourage literacy-building activities at home:

  • Limit television and computer time in favor of reading time. This will really hit home when they see their role model limiting device time in favor of reading.
  • Let children write and read the grocery lists. YES, it will take longer. But they will soon be able to anticipate your needs and help you prepare your shopping lists.
  • Going somewhere? Look at the map, research online, compare the hotels, find the most interesting route. All of these are engaging and challenging activities which require a lot of reading, thinking, and calculation skills.
  • Establish a reading time. Try talking about your favorite books and see if they start to share their stories too. Make the library a regular family destination.
  • Provide props or materials for dramatic play/storytelling.
  • Read to or with your child at least 15 minutes each day. Encourage older siblings to share books.
  • Go over your monthly budget with your kids! Use whiteboards, or sticky notes or show them your budget or app. Let children see how you keep track of expenditures every month and use math skills to help you do so.
  • Plan a party: Can the elder ones plan the younger one’s birthday parties? Budget, location, cakes, decorations, gifts… it’s a potential career, after all. Show them how you do it and explain the tricks you’ve learned to keep things under control.
  • I highly recommend the book, “The Read-Aloud Handbook.” It is an awesome resource for teachers and families. It stresses the importance of reading aloud to your child and gives you many book recommendations. Click HERE to order it from Amazon.

PCA elementary students enjoy learning to read in a nurturing, challenging, and affirming Christ-centered environment. We are dedicated to using varied instructional methods to meet the needs of every student.

Thank you for partnering with us!
Ryan Batson, Elementary Principal